I am an African, daughter of the African soil. 

I hope you know that hair is every women’s rightful crown, so please don’t make me feel bad for being comfortable with my own hair. Don’t instil doubts in me, doubts that my hair is not good enough and even in 2016 there’s no room for my big afro.

I hope you know that… My hair is my pride, my hair is my identity, my hair is my human right, my knots are beautiful and my African hair is what makes me proud to be daughter of the African soil.

You teach me self-love, but why should I love myself with conditions? Why is my hair an issue? How does it disturb your peace? It took me a long time to accept my natural hair, to feel beautiful with my natural hair, I will not let anyone to tell me otherwise. I am not your expectations, I am the soul that lives within.

“At the turn of the century it is time for us to redefine who we be. You can shave it off like a South African beauty or get in on a lock like Bob Marley, you can rock it straight like Oprah Winfrey. If it is not what’s on your head, it’s what’s underneath and say hey hey I am not my hair” India Arie_I am not my hair

Black child you are beautiful don’t let them tell you otherwise.

#MyHairMyCrown

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faith prevails in the streets of Pretoria

People always say, be grateful of what you have because someone else is busy praying for all that you have and I fully comprehend, because my experience in the streets of Pretoria has left me humbled.

What left me in awe the most was a man I met in the streets who reads a bible everyday, because it helps him. I thought of the amount of times my faith has been fragile, where i kept questioning God’s will and that time I have food, clothes and and a roof over my head. I can not begin to comprehend what a normal day is like for a homeless person, how they survive the cold winter nights with an empty stomach is what gets to me all the time.

There are real life stories, real families and intellects in our streets, we are just so busy absorbed in our busy lives that we don’t stop to make time and add a little bit of hope in someones life.

The social market frenzy

IMG-20160816-WA0005By: Naledi Mokgele

So I went to the Social market on the 4th of August on Sunday at 012 Central and it was packed, people arrived in numbers including, regulars and first timers like me to celebrate fashion, art and to socialise. Social MMarket takes place on the first Sunday of every month it is the home of rebels, fashion, food and art.

All my life I have never thought of myself as an outcast, untill I got to the Social Market where I felt like I was from a different planet and had missed the memo. I was so overwhelmed and my eyes could not help, but stare at every second person I came across. The type of clothes people wear at the Social market is so different. Even their hair is out of this world as I came across all hair colours from pink to green.
I admire the people at the Social Market for being so bold and unapologetic about it, I always thought of myself as someone who never wants to conform to the standards of society. However after my visit at the Social Market I realised I’m just an average girl that actually plays it safe.

The food at the Market was amazing and the people were friendly, but as for the fashion I am not too sure hey. It is very extreme and demands attention, and it got me asking myself is the extreme hair and fashion really a symbol of being different or is it individuals who are ocassionally  misunderstood screaming for the world to stop and take notice of their existence? My visit to the Social Market has however taught me that as people we express ourselves differently and it is ok.

Being different is ‘cool’ too

Rumor has it that conforming to the standards of society is no more a trend. Being a rebel is the new cool and being different is the new trend. Ever heard of fashion of fashion rebels? The cool kids on the block, that are not afraid to express themselves differently even if society is always ready to bash them?
The founders of the social market have started a new culture in the streets of Pretoria a culture where people are united through art. A culture where a different is the new normal, The Social Market celebrates uniqueness and it is a ‘playground for individuals that don’t want to be boxed or are tired of being labeled as weird , just because they refuse to succumb to a norm set by society.
On Sunday I am going to brace the streets of Pretoria and join the new movement, where i will be celebrated for just being me the event is taking place on Sunday at 012 Central Stanza Bopape Street opposite the Reserve bank.
I am so excited to be part of this exciting phenomenon, let us tweet @StarsThoughts05 don’t be the odd one out join the ‘hashtag’ #RebelsAtHeart looking forward to seeing you all cool kids at the social market.

Elections are nothing but a gamble of faith

By: Naledi Mokgele

Elections are nothing, but a gamble of faith we vote and hope for nothing but the best that right there is what I call faith. For the longest time I have been pondering on these questions, Why do people vote? Why must I vote? Is it really important? Will my vote really make a difference? I have been skeptical about voting all my life, trying to answer these questions has not been easy, but truth is voting really is important and yes, my vote can and will make a difference.

I guess my judgement has been clouded from seeing my parents take part in local and national elections and still complain about things like poor service delivery. They would talk about how after the elections the government forgets about the people and the promises they made to them. And the constant service delivery protests seemed to be a norm in the news (in our communities).  So because of all these failed promises I started to question the relevance and importance of elections.

I was so consumed by the negative opinions surrounding me and I overlooked the positive side of voting. At some point in my life growth had to happen and  I needed to stop being naive and do some self introspection and ask myself questions like, what if my vote really can make a difference? What if the South Africa I pray for, will only exists once I decide to take a stand and exercise my rights as a citizen?I pray for change and I complain, but what difference does it make if I don’t vote? 

I am born in to the generation of privileges, the generation that has rights and it is therefore my responsibility to exercise these rights in to enforcing change. `If I don’t vote who is going to bring that change? So I got a wake up call and saw the importance of elections, especially local elections. I had to snap out of my comfort zone and work torwardschange. Local elections are important, because they cater for the needs of an ordinary citizen, it is a platform created for ordinary citizens to have a voice in exercising their rights in bringing the change they believe in. We take part in local elections so we can elect a representative that will adhere to our needs. We vote with the hope for a better tomorrow and we entrust our local leaders to deliver outstanding service delivery. I have gambled with my faith, by voting for the first time in my life on the 3rd August 2016. I made my mark, I have seen the manifestos, it is now time to see them implemented. My faith says change is here.

If you intetrested in more articles related to the elections you can visit the following sites. http://www.capetalk.co.za/articles/15454/who-will-govern-the-western-cape-after-the-2016-local-government-elections , ewn.co.za/2016/08/06/maimane-describes-2016-local-elections-as-historic-moment-for-SA, www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-36997461, http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2016-08-05-lge2016-results-anc-takes-battering-while-opposition-heads-for-coalition-talks/#V7loN5h97iu and http://www.swnewsmedia.com/lakeshore_weekly/news/local/election-races-talking-shape/article-98d5b87-4173-5816-aceb-67608bd69d51.hmml